John SERRATI

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John SERRATI
Authorized to co-supervise theses and Adjunct Professeur

PhD. University of St Andrews
MA. McGill University
BA. McGill University

Office: Desmarais 10121


Work E-mail: jserrati@uOttawa.ca

John Serrati

Biography

Authorized to co-supervise theses

Biography

John Serrati did his doctoral work at the university of St Andrews in Scotland. He taught at St Andrews, the Queen's University of Belfast, and McGill University before becoming an adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa.  He is also an assistant professor of Classics at John Abbott College in Montreal.  His main area of research examines Roman imperialism and the creation of early overseas territorial dominions, for which Sicily acts as a microcosm.  More broadly, his research considers the role that royal and state economies played in projections of power and in providing rulers and ruling elites the means to wage war.  Other ongoing projects include the reception of classical Sparta in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the perception of space in the early Roman forum, and a greater study of ancient imperialism.

Publications

Serrati, J., Beck, H. and Jehne, M. (Eds.) (2016). Money and Power in the Roman Republic. Brussels: Latomus.

Serrati, J. (2016). Early Provincial Economies in the West: The lex Hieronica and the Financing of Roman Conquest. In H. Beck, M. Jehne and J. Serrati (Eds.) Money and Power in the Roman Republic. Brussels: Latomus.114-130.

Serrati, J. (2016). War, Weaponry, and Empire. In N. Dalmackie et al. (eds), The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Empire. Oxford: Blackwell: 1-13.

Serrati, J. (2015). Éditer les fragments des historiens romains. Latomus, 74, 1077-1083.

Serrati, J. (2013). Government and Warfare. In H. Beck (Ed.). A Companion to Ancient Greek Government. Oxford: Blackwell. 317-331.

Serrati, J. (2013).  The Hellenistic Experience with War: Stagnation or Development? In B. Campbell and L. Trittle (Eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Warfare in the Classical World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.179-198.

Serrati, J. (2012). Various entries. In R.S. Bagnall et al. (Eds.). The Encyclopedia of Ancient History. Oxford: Blackwell

Serrati, J. (2012). Imperial Expansion and the Fall of the Roman Republic: Post Hoc, Propter Hoc. In D. Hoyos (Ed.) The Companion to Roman Imperialism. Leiden: Brill. 155-168.

Serrati, J. and  Covino, R.J. (2012). Euripides’ Bacchae and the Greek Theatre in Syracuse. Didaskalia 9, 38-44.

Serrati, J. (2011). The Rise of Rome to 264. In D. Hoyos (Ed.). The Blackwell Companion to the Punic Wars. Oxford: Blackwell. 9-27.

Serrati, J. (2011). Neptune’s Altars: The Treaties Between Rome and Carthage (509-226 BC). (Republication of 2006 article, infra). The Best Classical Scholarship of the Last Sixty Years: Classical Quarterly Special Issue. 100-121.

Serrati, J. (2009). Ancient Labour Action and the Secessio Plebis. Locus, 39.2, 51-52.

Serrati, J. (2008). A Syracusan Private Altar and the Development of Ruler-Cult in Hellenistic Sicily. Historia 57, 80-91.

Serrati, J. (2007). Warfare and the State. In P. Sabin, H. van Wees, and L.M. Whitby (Eds.). The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Warfare. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 461-497.

Serrati, J. (2006). Neptune’s Altars: The Treaties Between Rome and Carthage (509-226 BC). Classical Quarterly 66, 113-134.

Serrati, J., Anglim, S. et al. (2002). Fighting Techniques of the Ancient World 3000 BC-AD 500: Equipment, Combat Skills, and Tactics. New York: St Martin’s,  256 pp.

Serrati, J. and Smith, C.J. (Eds.) (2000). Sicily from Aeneas to Augustus: New Approaches in Archaeology and History.  Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 241 pp.

Serrati, J. (2000). Garrisons and Grain: Sicily between the Punic Wars. In C.J. Smith and J. Serrati (Eds.). Sicily from Aeneas to Augustus: New Approaches in Archaeology and History. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 115-133.

Serrati, J. (1997). Ammianus Marcellinus on Siege Warfare. Archaeo 4, 53-62.

Fields of Interest

  • Roman Imperialism
  • Warfare and State Economies
  • Ancient Sicily
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