Review: Noun, Adjective, and Adverb Clauses

See if you can determine the function of the hilighted dependent clause in each of the following passages. Remember that a noun clause answers questions like "who(m)?" or "what?"; an adjective clause answers questions like "which (one)?"; and an adverb clause answers questions like "when?", "where?", "why?", "with what goal/result?", and "under what conditions?".

 

 

1. Some people buy expensive cars simply because they can.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause answers the question "why," showing cause, so it is an adverb clause. It does not act as a subject or object, and it does not modify a noun or pronoun.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause answers the question "why," showing cause, so it is an adverb clause. It does not act as a subject or object, and it does not modify a noun or pronoun.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause answers the question "why," showing cause, so it is an adverb clause. It does not act as a subject or object, and it does not modify a noun or pronoun.

 

 

2. Many people hope that Canada can resolve its economic problems.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is correct.

Explanation:

The clause answers the question "what?", and acts as the direct object of the verb "hope."

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

The clause answers the question "what?", and acts as the direct object of the verb "hope."

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is not correct.

Explanation:

The clause answers the question "what?", and acts as the direct object of the verb "hope."

 

 

3. The bankers need to know what they should do.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause does not tell you which bankers need to know, but rather, it tells you what they need to know -- since it answers the question "what?" (and acts as the direct object of "to know"), it is a noun clause.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause does not tell you which bankers need to know, but rather, it tells you what they need to know -- since it answers the question "what?" (and acts as the direct object of "to know"), it is a noun clause.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause does not tell you which bankers need to know, but rather, it tells you what they need to know -- since it answers the question "what?" (and acts as the direct object of "to know"), it is a noun clause.

 

 

4. Which one is the person who stole your car?

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

The relative pronoun "who" might have confused you here; however, the clause itself does not answer the question "who?", but the question "which person?", showing that it modifies the noun "person" and is acting as an adjective clause.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is correct.

Explanation:

The relative pronoun "who" might have confused you here; however, the clause itself does not answer the question "who?", but the question "which person?", showing that it modifies the noun "person" and is acting as an adjective clause.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is not correct.

Explanation:

The relative pronoun "who" might have confused you here; however, the clause itself does not answer the question "who?", but the question "which person?", showing that it modifies the noun "person" and is acting as an adjective clause.

 

 

5. Wherever there is a large American city, there will be poverty.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause tells where poverty will exist, and specifying a location is the function of an adverb or (in this case) of an adverb clause.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause tells where poverty will exist, and specifying a location is the function of an adverb or (in this case) of an adverb clause.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause tells where poverty will exist, and specifying a location is the function of an adverb or (in this case) of an adverb clause.

 

 

6. The books which the professor assigned were very expensive.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause modifies the noun "books," and modifying a noun or pronoun is the function of an adjective or (in this case) of an adjective clause.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause modifies the noun "books," and modifying a noun or pronoun is the function of an adjective or (in this case) of an adjective clause.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause modifies the noun "books," and modifying a noun or pronoun is the function of an adjective or (in this case) of an adjective clause.

 

 

7. Canada might give up its marketing boards if the European Community gives up its grain subsidies.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause provides the conditions under which Canada might give up its marketing boards, and it is an adverb or an adverb clause which answers the question "under what conditions?".

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause provides the conditions under which Canada might give up its marketing boards, and it is an adverb or an adverb clause which answers the question "under what conditions?".

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause provides the conditions under which Canada might give up its marketing boards, and it is an adverb or an adverb clause which answers the question "under what conditions?".

 

 

8. That is the place where Wolfe's and Montcalm's armies fought.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This is a very tricky example, and the subordinating conjunction "where" could have fooled you. In fact, the clause does not answer the adverb question "where?", but the adjective question "which place?". This is an adjective clause, modifying the noun "place."

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is correct.

Explanation:

This is a very tricky example, and the subordinating conjunction "where" could have fooled you. In fact, the clause does not answer the adverb question "where?", but the adjective question "which place?". This is an adjective clause, modifying the noun "place."

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This is a very tricky example, and the subordinating conjunction "where" could have fooled you. In fact, the clause does not answer the adverb question "where?", but the adjective question "which place?". This is an adjective clause, modifying the noun "place."

 

 

9. Unless the crown can make a better case, the accused murderer will not be convicted.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause provides the conditions under which the accused murderer will not be convicted, so it must be an adverb clause.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause provides the conditions under which the accused murderer will not be convicted, so it must be an adverb clause.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause provides the conditions under which the accused murderer will not be convicted, so it must be an adverb clause.

 

 

10. It is important to ask whether the wedding is formal or semi-formal.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer noun clause is correct.

Explanation:

This clause is the direct object of the infinitive "to ask," answering the question "what is it important to ask?".

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adjective clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause is the direct object of the infinitive "to ask," answering the question "what is it important to ask?".

Oops!

Answer:

The answer adverb clause is not correct.

Explanation:

This clause is the direct object of the infinitive "to ask," answering the question "what is it important to ask?".