Review: Sentence Usage

After reading the previous sections, decide whether the following sections are effective or ineffective sentences.

 

 

1. Albert Einstein's famous quotation "God does not play dice" was his reaction to the disturbing theory that the universe is essentially the outcome of random events.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer This is an effective sentence is not correct.

Explanation:

Einstein's quotation is very effective (though he turned out to be wrong), and it deserves a position of emphasis in the sentence. Consider how much more effective the sentence becomes when you move the quotation to the end:
Quantum physicists argued that the universe is essentially the outcome of random events, but Albert Einstein replied that "God does not play dice."
Moving the quotation to the end makes this a periodic sentence, with the quotation as its climax.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer This is not an effective sentence is correct.

Explanation:

Einstein's quotation is very effective (though he turned out to be wrong), and it deserves a position of emphasis in the sentence. Consider how much more effective the sentence becomes when you move the quotation to the end:
Quantum physicists argued that the universe is essentially the outcome of random events, but Albert Einstein replied that "God does not play dice."
Moving the quotation to the end makes this a periodic sentence, with the quotation as its climax.

 

 

2. Racism should be unacceptable in American society by now, but every year the newspapers still report on racially-motivated attacks, questionable police shootings, and groups who actively promote the superiority of whites over blacks or blacks over whites.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer This is an effective sentence is correct.

Explanation:

The writer of this sentence is presuming that reader will agree that racism should be unacceptable, but then goes on to present evidence that, despite the best intentions of people like the reader, racism is still common. For this type of an argument, a loose sentence like this one works well: the writer begins with an uncontroversial statement to gain the reader's confidence, then proceeds gradually to introduce more controversial points.

Oops!

Answer:

The answer This is not an effective sentence is not correct.

Explanation:

The writer of this sentence is presuming that reader will agree that racism should be unacceptable, but then goes on to present evidence that, despite the best intentions of people like the reader, racism is still common. For this type of an argument, a loose sentence like this one works well: the writer begins with an uncontroversial statement to gain the reader's confidence, then proceeds gradually to introduce more controversial points.

 

 

3. The citizens of Kingston have gone too long without decent bicycle paths!

Oops!

Answer:

The answer This is an effective sentence is not correct.

Explanation:

While the issue of bicycle paths is an important one, the writer has made a serious mistake here by using an exclamatory sentence -- it makes the tone look forced and the writer, insincere. Use an exclamatory sentence only when a point is truly shocking.

Good Work!

Answer:

The answer This is not an effective sentence is correct.

Explanation:

While the issue of bicycle paths is an important one, the writer has made a serious mistake here by using an exclamatory sentence -- it makes the tone look forced and the writer, insincere. Use an exclamatory sentence only when a point is truly shocking.