Teaching Thinking, Thinking Teaching

Posted on Monday, March 26, 2018

Teaching Thinking, Thinking Teaching

Faculty of Arts Conference Series

Teaching Thinking, Thinking Teaching

Keynote Speaker, Mark Kingwell, is a University of Toronto professor and a contributor for the Harper’s Magazine, This Magazine and the Globe and Mail notably. He not only publishes in academia but also for a general audience. He was awarded with the Spitz Price for Political Theory, the Drummer’s General Award and he received an Honorary Doctor of Fine art Degree from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

This lecture will address the place of humanities, and humanism, in a world dominated by technology.  The specific focus will be on how Artificial Intelligence and Artificial Life are affecting our sense of 'the human'.  Is there something essential and inimitable about the human, or are we evolving together with non-human entities to create a viable cyborg future?  It will conclude with some cautious optimism about the role of thinking and critical pedagogy in this evolution.

Mark Kingwell

Mark Kingwell is professor in the department of Philosophy at the University of Toronto. He is the author of many books, among which are Fail Better: Why Baseball Matters (Windsor: Biblioasis, 2017), Measure Yourself Against the Earth (Windsor: Biblioasis, 2015), Unruly Voices: Essays on Democracy, Civility and the Human Imagination (Windsor: Biblioasis, 2012).

 

Date: Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Time: 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Local:

Desmarais Building
Room DMS 12102
55 Laurier Ave. East
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5

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Price: This event is open to the public and is free to attend
RSVP:

Please register to this event by April 8th, 2018.
*Limited number of seats available.

Register Now

 

This conference will be presented in English followed by a bilingual question period. A reception will follow.

 


 

 

Faculty of Arts Conference Series - This conference series provides an opportunity for the university community and residents of the National Capital Region to hear from renowned speakers on topics related to the role of humanities, fine and performing arts, languages and literatures in the shaping of our modern, quickly evolving world.

 

 

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