Cory SAMPSON

E-Card

Cory SAMPSON
PhD Candidate

2012-Present: Ph.D., University of Ottawa (English Literature)
2010-2011: Master of Arts, University of Ottawa (English Literature)
2008-2009: Special student, University of Ottawa (full time Arts student, concentration inEnglish Literature)
2002-2006: Bachelor of Arts, Mount Allison University (English Major, Drama Minor)

Room: MHN 322

Work E-mail: csamp074@uottawa.ca

Cory Sampson

Biography

Memberships:

North American Society for Studies in Romanticism (NASSR)

North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA)

British Women Writers Association (BWWA)

Current Research

My SSHRC funded dissertation, “The Glass Sitting Room: Emotional Labour in Women's Work and Women's Relationships in Victorian Literature”, seeks to recontextualise the domestic ideology working upon literary representations of women in the Victorian workforce through the sociological concept of emotional labour. Initially coined by Arlie Hochschild in the 1970s, the term describes the (often unpaid) labour involved in the regulation of emotions, particularly in the service industry (whether the emotions of one's clients, or the emotions of the labourer themselves). Feminist scholars and thinkers both in the academy and in grass-roots activism have identified emotional labour as being expected of women without remuneration, both in the workplace and in women's personal relationships. Much extant scholarship in Victorian women's work has explored the phenomenon of women's work using the spatial metaphor of the “separate spheres” ideology – that the public sphere (including the workplace) was a predominantly masculine space, one of competition and strife, while the domestic sphere (exemplified by the Victorian home) was predominantly feminine, providing succour from the hardships of the public sphere. As a result, literature of women's work is often read as an incongruity that troubled the separate spheres ideology. However, as my dissertation suggests, the concept of prescriptive female emotional labour (though not defined as such by Victorians) enabled authors to reconcile this supposed incongruity by envisioning female relationships in the workforce as involving the assuaging of emotions that (ideally) would happen in domestic spaces. This expectation, however, meant that working women essentially performed double labour – both the physical labour involved in the work itself, and the emotional labour of maintaining a respectable domestic veneer in their working relationships. This double labour circumscribed women's participation in the workforce by exhausting and enervating women workers.

University Degrees

2012-Present: Ph.D., University of Ottawa (English Literature)

2010-2011: Master of Arts, University of Ottawa (English Literature)

2008-2009: Special student, University of Ottawa (full time Arts student, concentration in English Literature)

2002-2006: Bachelor of Arts, Mount Allison University (English Major, Drama Minor)

Fields of Interest

Women in Victorian literature

Victorian industrial fiction

Feminist literary criticism

History of women's writing

Courses Taught

ENG1120: Literature and Composition I: Prose Fiction – Studies in Literary Masculinities (Winter 2016)

ENG1120: Literature and Composition I: Prose Fiction (Winter 2015)

Scholarships and Awards

2015-2017: SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship

2012-2013: Ontario Graduate Scholarship

2012: Ph.D. Entrance Scholarship (University of Ottawa)

2010: MA Entrance Scholarship (University of Ottawa)

2009: Paul J. Marcotte Award (University of Ottawa)

Publications

“Pullman and Imperialism: Exploiting the Geographic Imagination in The Golden Compass.” Children's Literature and Imaginative Geography. Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier UP. [Publication Pending]

Conference Presentations

“‘Pretty Dwellings’: Millenium Hall, Lowell, and the Genealogy of Pseudo-Domestic Female Working Community.” British Women Writers Conference 2015: Relations. British Women Writers Association. City University of New York. 25-27 June 2015.

“'The English Mail Coach' and the Problem of Affective Transfer.” Romantic Movements. North American Society for Studies in Romanticism. Boston University. 7-1 August 2013.

The Golden Compass and the Ethics of Imperialism: Exploiting the Geographic Imagination.” Children’s Literature and Imaginative Geography Past, Present and Future. University of Ottawa. 12-13 October 2012.

 
 
Back to top