Description des cours des programmes de maîtrise et de doctorat

Hiver 2020

PHI 5336 A: German Philosophy I
Early German Romanticism: Around the Athenaeum review (1798-1800:  Schlegel, Novalis and Schleiermacher)
Professor: Jeffrey Reid
Day and Time: TBA
 
Course description
 
Early German Romanticism refers to the brief but intense period of philosophical and literary activity that took place in and around the Athenaeum review (1798 – 1800), principally through the “symphilosophical” writings of Fr. Schlegel, Novalis and Schleiermacher.  Reading texts from the review itself as well as from the other productions of the main protagonists will allow us to discover original and influential theories of Romantic irony, art, psychology, gender, religion, discourse. Taken together, the ideas of Early German Romanticism bespeak a new approach to philosophy and its privileged objects:  the self, the world and God.  More specifically, the seminar will examine Schlegel’s theories of the literary/philosophical fragment, irony and wit, as well as his thoughts on the hermeneutical nature of text and the fluidity of gender identities.  Novalis’ magical idealism (the linguistic poeticization of nature) will be approached through his philosophical reflections on Fichte’s foundational principle (I = I), as well as through readings from his own poetical/literary production.  Finally, the seminar will discuss Schleiermacher’s conception of religion as an individual feeling of the universe, thus including within itself the pursuits of Enlightenment reason pursuits and anticipating the infinite multiplicity of religious expressions. 

Early German Romanticism is currently enjoying a scholarly philosophical reevaluation, sometimes explicitly in light of what we now understand in terms of postmodernism:  where ironic and fragmentary forms are promoted over systematic articulations, where textual meaning only arises in the hermeneutical encounter between author and reader, where religion is a strictly personal expression, where discourse is recognized and celebrated, above all, for its performative agency. To the extent that many such elements have become constant features of our present worldly reality, discovering their prescient articulations in Early German Romanticism may allow us to uncover much about ourselves.

Evaluation

Evaluation:  This seminar is meant to function as a research group.  The five different evaluated activities are meant to reinforce this function.

1)  Each member will be asked to choose a topic from the list of subjects below and to report back to the group in an oral presentation on the topic, in summary form.  The list of topics represents specific works that either contribute to the development of Early German Romanticism or represent aspects of the time which further our understanding of it.  Each presentation should be about 25 minutes in length, followed by a question/discussion period.  (20% of final mark) Dates are listed below.

2) Over the course, each member will be asked to develop a five to six-page personal reflection, presenting a theme, question of problem the member considers worthy of further investigation. The reflection corresponds roughly to the “The Problem” section of a Masters-level thesis proposal. This proposal may not be based on the oral report topic described above. The reflection must involve an aspect of Early German Romanticism as presented in the seminar. (40% of final mark) It is due on the final seminar date.

3) Each member will be asked to make a brief (10 minute!) oral presentation of his/her project idea to the research group BEFORE the final project proposal is submitted to me. The group will discuss the interest and feasibility of the project, enabling the presenter to perhaps revise the project before submission. (10% of final mark)

4) With the personal reflection text, each member will be asked to submit an annotated bibliography (100 words/entry) of ten books or articles judged to be pertinent to the question/problem/theme raised. (20% of final mark) To be submitted with the proposal, The collected bibliography may be collated and supplied to each member.

5) Participation:  research group members are expected to attend all sessions. (10% is awarded to each member at the outset. One point is deducted for each absence – except with medical certificate) As well, members are expected to participate through questions and comments.  (10% - I emphasize that this form of participation is not just quantitative but above all QUALITATIVE.)

Bibliography

  • Selected readings from Fr. Schlegel (Fragments from the Athenaeum, the essay “On Incomprehensibility”, passages from his novel Lucinde), from Novalis (“Logological Fragments”, passages from the novel Henry of Ofterdingen and the poem Hymns to the Night) and from Schleiermacher’s Discourses on Religion to Its Cultured Despisers. Some influential or foundational texts will also be presented and discussed (e.g. opening sections of Fichte’s Doctrine of Science, Schelling’s “Epicurean Confession”). 
PHI 5346 A: Social and Political Philosophy I
The Idea of Democracy
Professor: Hilliard Aronovitch
Day and Time: TBA

Course description

This seminar will explore current philosophical questions about democracy, including: What is the justification for democracy? Are culturally neutral foundations attainable? What should be the basic aims of law and policy? Should democratic politics seek compromises or consensus? Are interest groups a vehicle or an obstacle for democracy? Is an activist Supreme Court an instrument of democracy or an impediment to it? What sort of popular participation can and should contemporary democracy provide? Does democracy require special virtues of its citizens to be viable? What, if anything, does the theory of "deliberative democracy" offer? What is the relation of (1) liberalism, (2) republicanism, and (3) socialism to democracy? What is "populism" vis-á-vis democracy?

While the focus will be on current concerns and theorists, there will be reference throughout to background thinkers such as Rousseau, Marx, Mill, Tocqueville, and Arendt, and some issues will be focused by reference to legal cases.

Evaluation

Commentary 1 (3 pages), on designated reading: 20%

Commentary 2 (3 pages), on designated reading: 20%

Seminar presentation OR written submission, on paper project: 10% 

Paper, 4000-5000 words: 50%

Bibliography

  • T. Christiano, ed., Philosophy and Democracy (Oxford University Press 2003).
  • Shapiro, The State of Democratic Theory (Princeton University Press, 2003).
  • C. Mudde and C. R. Kaltwasser (eds.), Populism in Europe and the Americas: Threat or Corrective for Democracy? (Cambridge University Press, 2013).
  • Supreme Court of Canada (SCC): http://scc-csc.lexum.com/scc-csc/en/nav.do
  • Supreme Court of U.S. (SCOTUS): https://www.supremecourt.gov/

There is a course website at Virtual Campus; announcements and occasional notes posted. 

PHI 5355 A: Anglo-American Philosophy II
Pragmatism or Analysis: John Dewey Versus Bertrand Russell
Professor: Paul Forster
Day and Time: TBA

Course description

John Dewey was the most influential philosopher in the United States at the height of his career and Bertrand Russell was the most influential British philosopher of the 20th century.  Their published exchanges  encompass relatively few pages yet they extend to views on the nature of logic, knowledge, truth, value and philosophical method.  Dewey thinks Russell fails to appreciate the extent to which developments in biology and behavioural science undermine the presuppositions of the epistemological questions that he looks to solve.  Russell thinks Dewey fails to recognize how contemporary methods of logical analysis applied to perception, causation, mind, and matter clarify traditional epistemological questions and undercut presuppositions Dewey inherits uncritically from post-Kantian idealism.  Dewey argues that Russell’s epistemology is conceptually confused and empirically indefensible. Russell argues that Dewey fails adequately to distinguish logic, psychology and epistemology and dismisses fundamental philosophical questions simply because they do not advance his social goals in education and democratic politics.  The course offers a careful examination of what is at stake in this debate over the legitimacy of Russell’s and Dewey’s philosophical projects and its implications for contemporary philosophy.  No familiarity with this material is presupposed.

Evaluation

(i) A major term paper (20 pages or so) to be written in stages (i.e. an abstract, an outline, a draft, and final submission) over the latter half of the term. 

(ii) Collaborative work on classmates’ papers at each stage.

(iii) Weekly submission of questions and comments (1-2 pages each).

Bibliography

  • Photocopied readings drawn from the works of Russell and Dewey early and late.
PHI 5736 A: Philosophie allemande
La Critique de la raison pure de Kant
Professeur: David Hyder
Jours et heures: À venir

Description de cours

La Critique de la Raison Pure représente l’œuvre philosophique la plus importante après les textes d'Aristote. Elle effectue une inversion complète de la métaphysique traditionnelle, affirmant que la structure de la pensée rationnelle ne reflète pas celle de l'être ; au contraire, celle-ci est projetée sur un monde essentiellement inconnaissable et donc « indéterminé ».

Puisque ce projet nécessite une refonte complète de la métaphysique aristotélicienne, la Critique englobe la totalité de la connaissance théorique, mais cela, au niveau le plus abstrait. Substance, espace, temps, causalité, ordre rationnel du cosmos ainsi que cogito cartésien—tous ces thèmes sont traités ici, apparaissant en tant que normes cognitives.

Dans ce cours nous lirons les parties principales de la Critique ainsi que des extraits des Prolégomènes. Le texte étant difficile, nous nous chargerons de le redonner dans un langage clair et contemporain. Nous examinerons également deux interprétations contemporaines de la Critique, très différentes, qui dominent la discussion contemporaine, (Friedman, 1992) et (Longuenesse 1993).

Textes

Friedman, Michael. 1992. Kant and the Exact Sciences, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press.

Kant, Emmanuel. 1986. Prolégomènes à toute métaphysique future, trad. L. Guillermit. Paris, Vrin.

Kant, Emmanuel. 2001. Critique de la raison pure, trad. A. Renaut. Paris, Flammarion.

Longuenesse, Beatrice. 1993. Kant et le pouvoir de juger: sensiblilté et discursivité dans L'Analytique transcendantale de la Critique de la raison pure, Paris, Presses Universitaires de France.

Évaluation

Presentation: 20%

Participation: 10%

Travail final: 70%

PHI 5746 A: Philosophie sociale et politique I
Les conditions de la démocratie
Professeur: David Robichaud
Jours et heures: À venir

Description de cours

Et si la démocratie ne pouvait produire des résultats satisfaisants que dans un monde idéal? L’enthousiasme en faveur du marché économique concurrentiel a rapidement heurté les écueils d’une réalité non idéale causant de nombreux échecs de marché exigeant de laisser tomber la théorie idéale. Plusieurs commencent à penser que la même chose se produira avec la démocratie. Les biais cognitifs dont sont victimes les électeurs, l’influence hors de contrôle et disproportionnée des lobbies sur les décideurs, le manque de mobilisation et de coordination des citoyens, la partisannerie excessive, et le nouveau phénomène des « fake news » et la perte de confiance envers les médias de masse contribuent à remettre en question les fondements de la démocratie.

Le séminaire visera à questionner les multiples fondements normatifs de la démocratie. Les justifications instrumentales et non-instrumentales seront abordées. La démocratie est-elle seulement justifiable par les résultats qu’elle rend possible, ou est-elle justifiable en elle-même, indépendamment de ces résultats?

***Ce séminaire se déroulera dans les dernières semaines avant le dépôt d’un manuscrit portant sur la démocratie et ses justifications.***

ÉVALUATION

Voici un aperçu des évaluations qui pourraient être proposées aux étudiants :

1. Animation d’une séance et présentation orale de l’argument d’un des textes obligatoires. Les étudiants disposeront d’un maximum de 30 minutes pour présenter l’argument d’un texte et le mettre en perspective. (25% de la note finale)

2. Présentation orale d’une critique à l’un des textes présentés par un étudiant. Les étudiants disposeront d’un maximum de 10 minutes pour présenter un commentaire critique du texte présenté par un collègue. (15% de la note finale)

3. Présentation de deux synthèses de textes, l’une tirée des lectures obligatoires, l’autre d’un texte pertinent ne faisant pas partie des lectures obligatoires. Les synthèses d’une page à une page et demie seront remises à tout moment par les étudiants. (10% chacune)

4. Rédaction d’un travail final abordant un des aspects présentés lors du séminaire. Les étudiants seront invités à rédiger un travail de recherche portant sur un thème de leur choix lié au sujet du séminaire. Le travail de recherche d’une vingtaine de pages sera remis à la fin de la session. Les étudiants auront aussi la possibilité de présenter oralement leurs travaux lors d’un colloque qui se tiendra à la fin de la session. (40% de la note finale)

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

  • Jason Brennan (2016). Against Democracy, Princeton University Press.
  • Brian Caplan (2008). The Myth of the Rational Voter, Princeton University Press.
  • B. Paige & M. Gilens (2017). Democracy in America. What Has Gone Wrong and What We Can Do About It, Chicago University Press.
  • Martin Gilens (2014). Affluence and Influence. Economic Inequality and Political Power in America, Princeton University Press.
  • David Robichaud et Patrick Turmel (À paraître). Titre à venir, Manuscrit.
  • Pierre Rosanvallon (2014). La contre-démocratie. La politique à l’âge de la défiance, Seuil.
  • Pierre Rosanvallon (2017). Le bon gouvernement, Points.
PHI 5771 A: Philosophie sociale et politique II
Marcel Gauchet face à la crise contemporaine de la démocratie libérale
Professeur: Daniel Tanguay
Jours et heures: À venir
 

Description de cours

Dans une œuvre ambitieuse qui mélange de manière habile et érudite la philosophie, l’histoire des idées politiques et l’histoire tout court, Marcel Gauchet a réfléchi en profondeur sur la naissance et l’évolution de la démocratie dans nos sociétés. Il a livré le fruit de ses réflexions dans un ouvrage à plusieurs volets qui s’intitule justement L’avènement de la démocratie (2007-2017). Si dans le premier tome de cette ambitieuse tétralogie il retraçait les grandes lignes de ce qui appelait la révolution moderne qui fut caractérisée par la naissance de la démocratie moderne, il montrait dans un second tome que la démocratie libérale avait traversé une crise profonde de 1880 à 1914. Cette crise de croissance du libéralisme allait déboucher sur diverses tentatives de solution dont l’une d’entre elles — le totalitarisme qu’il soit communiste ou fasciste — allait presque réussir à mettre un terme à l’aventure démocratique. Gauchet a exploré le phénomène totalitaire dans un fort volume constituant le troisième moment de sa démonstration. Dans un dernier volume paru tout récemment, le philosophe français examine le sort des démocraties après l’échec des totalitarismes. Si notre époque a bel et bien été le témoin du triomphe de la démocratie libérale, ce triomphe, comme semble le confirmer les événements politiques récents et la résurgence de formes nouvelles et anciennes d’autoritarisme anti-démocratique, n’était pas sans ambiguïté. Gauchet fut probablement l’un des philosophes contemporains les plus sensibles aux ambivalences propres à la démocratie libérale à l’heure de son triomphe. L’objet de ce séminaire sera d’examiner ce que Gauchet a à nous dire sur la crise contemporaine de la démocratie à travers l’analyse qu’il en offre dans son dernier livre — Le nouveau monde (2017), sans nous interdire toutefois de puiser des éléments de compréhension dans ces autres ouvrages.  Cette analyse de la pensée de Gauchet sera menée avec l’intention de mieux comprendre notre propre situation politique.

Évaluation

1) Participation.............................................................................…………………....10%

2) Travail principal (en deux étapes) (90 %):

a) Problématique, hypothèses, bibliographie (15%)

i) présentation orale du travail (10 minutes) lors d’une rencontre individuelle……………………………...................................5%

ii) présentation écrite de 4 pages ………….............................10%

b) Travail final (75%)

i) présentation orale de 20 minutes………..............................25%

ii) présentation écrite de 15-30 pages……………..................50%

BIBLIOGRAPHIE

Ouvrages de Marcel Gauchet

  • Le Désenchantement du monde : une histoire politique de la religion, Paris, Gallimard, 1985, 306 p. Réédition : Paris, Gallimard, « Folio Essais », 2005, 457 p.
  • La religion dans la démocratie : parcours de la laïcité, Paris, Gallimard, 1998, 127 p. Réédition : Paris, Gallimard,  « Folio Essais », 2001, 182 p.
  • La démocratie contre elle-même, Paris, Gallimard, 2002, 385 p.
  • La condition historique : entretiens avec François Azouvi et Sylvain Piron, Paris, Stock, 2003, 354 p. Réédition : Paris, Gallimard, « Folio Essais », 2005, 482 p.
  • Avec Luc Ferry, Le religieux après la religion, Paris, Grasset, « Nouveau Collège de philosophie », 2004, 144 p.
  • La condition politique, Paris, Gallimard, « Tel »,  2005, 557 p.
  • Un monde désenchanté?, Paris, Éditions de l’Atelier/Éditions ouvrières, 2004, 253 p. Réédition : Paris, Pocket, « Agora », 2007, 347 p.
  • L’avènement de la démocratie. I- La révolution moderne, Paris, Gallimard, 2007, 206 p.
  • L’avènement de la démocratie. II- La crise du libéralisme, 1880-1914, Paris, Gallimard, 2007, 312 p. 
  • L’avènement de la démocratie. III- À l’épreuve des totalitarismes,1914-1974, Paris, Gallimard, 2010, 657 p.
  • L’avènement de la démocratie. IV-Le nouveau monde, Paris, Gallimard, 2017, 768 p.

Ouvrages sur Marcel Gauchet

  • BOBINEAU, Olivier, Le religieux et le politique, suivi de Douze réponses de Marcel Gauchet, Paris, Desclée de Brouwer, « Religion et politique », 2010, 130 p.
  • BERGERON, Patrice, La sortie de la religion. Brève introduction à la pensée de Marcel Gauchet, Montréal, Éditions Athéna, 2009, 170 p.
  • BRAECKMAN, Antoon (Dir.), La démocratie à bout de souffle? Une introduction critique à la philosophie politique de Marcel Gauchet, Louvain-la-Neuve, Éditons de l’Institut supérieur de philosophie/Éditions Peeters, 2007, 167 p.
  • LABELLE, Gilles, et Daniel TANGUAY, Vers une démocratie désenchantée ? Marcel Gauchet et la crise contemporaine de la démocratie, Montréal, Fides, 2013, 285 p.
  • NAULT, François (Dir.), Religion, modernité et démocratie, en dialogue avec Marcel Gauchet, Québec, 2008, 198 p. 
  • PADIS, Marc-Olivier, Marcel Gauchet. La genèse de la démocratie, Paris, Michalon, 1995. 115 p.

Automne 2019

PHI 5331 A: Ancient Philosophy I
A Contemplative Life: The Interdependence of Metaphysics and Ethics in Aristotle
Professor: Francisco Gonzalez
Day and Time: TBA

Course description

While Aristotle insisted on keeping metaphysics and ethics distinct in both their methodology and subject matter, there are yet evident and crucial ways in which his metaphysics is informed by his ethics and vice versa. In the very first book of the Metaphysics what Aristotle himself calls ‘first philosophy’ or ‘wisdom’ is characterized as the ‘freest’ science because the science of the free man, a claim that parallels the argument in the last book of the Nicomachean Ethics that theoria is essential to human happiness because rendering us to the greatest degree possible self-sufficient. Furthermore, the Metaphysics culminates in Book 12 with a description of the highest substance, i.e., the divine unmoved mover, as living not only a pleasant life but precisely the life we aspire to and experience only approximately and on occasion. The highest object of metaphysics thereby becomes quite literally the highest good pursued in ethics. There is, however, a connection between Aristotle’s metaphysics and ethics even more fundamental than these especially evident ones. What is arguably the most important ontological concept in Aristotle’s metaphysics because expressing the primary and strictest sense of being is energeia. This is, however, also the central concept of his ethics without which the good, virtue and happiness cannot be understood. Far from the term being used ambiguously in the two cases, when Aristotle in Book 9 of the Metaphysics finally gives an account of energeia in the ontological sense central to his interests there, his examples of energeia, such as life, happiness and contemplation, are taken right out of the realm of ethics. When, furthermore, the unmoved mover is characterized as pure energeia in Book 12, this energeia is immediately identified with living, thinking, and even pleasure. Unfortunately, this connection has been hidden by the tendency of translating energeia as ‘actuality’ in the context of the Metaphysics while as ‘activity’ in the Ethics. This tendency is finally resisted in the most recent translation of the Metaphysics by C.D.C. Reeve who translates energeia consistently as ‘activity’. By using Reeve’s translation as the basis of our study along with his translation of the Nicomachean Ethics we will be better able to see and think through the essential connections between Aristotle’s account of being and his account of the human good. For the reasons mentioned, our study will focus on Books 1, 9 and 12 of the Metaphysics (though with a look also at the indispensable Book 4 where the defense of the principle of non-contradiction as presupposed by all speech and action suggests another important connection with the Ethics) and Books 1, 6 (the discussion of ‘intellectual virtues’ including wisdom) and 10 of the Nicomachean Ethics.

Evaluation

Evaluation will take the form of weekly analyses of the texts read, a seminar presentation, and a major final research paper.

Bibliography

Aristotle, Metaphysics, trans. with notes, C. D. C. Reeve (Hackett, 2016).

If you can work at all with the Greek, it is also highly recommended that you get a hold of Ross’ two volume edition of the text with commentary.

For those capable of reading French, the Flammarion translation by Duminil and Jaulin is highly recommended.

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, trans. with notes C. D. C. Reeve (Hackett, 2014)

The Flammarion translation by Richard Bodéüs can also be recommended.

PHI 5341 A: Logic and Philosophy of Science
Frege
Professor: Paul Rusnock
Day and Time: TBA
 
Course description
 
To the extent that he was noticed at all during his lifetime, Gottlob Frege (1848-1925) was looked upon for the most part as a secondrate provincial mathematician, a sharp-tongued polemicist obsessed with what seemed to be minor points of detail. Rare were the philosophers who understood the vital importance of his groundbreaking work in logic, philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of language. Though greatly appreciated around the turn of the twentieth century by Husserl and Russell, and later by Carnap, Wittgenstein, and others, Frege’s ideas would only gain a measure of popularity in the mid-twentieth century, well after his death, when he was celebrated by numerous philosophers, sometimes with excessive fervour, for his role in putting philosophy on a new path. A more balanced view has emerged in recent decades, which recognises the enduring importance and interest of many of Frege’s contributions to philosophy, while better situating his work in its historical context and without minimizing its limitations. This seminar will be devoted to a comprehensive introduction to Frege’s thought, including the logical system, the work on the foundations of arithmetic, the seminal papers in the philosophy of logic and language, and his set-to with David Hilbert over the latter’s Foundations of Geometry.

Évaluation

Seminar presentation(s), paper.

Bibliographie

Non spécifiée.

PHI 5731 A: Philosophie Ancienne I
Stoïcisme et Bouddhisme : une culture du détachement et de l’impassibilité
Professeur: Catherine Collobert
Jours et heures: À venir

Description de cours:

Cette étude de philosophie comparée se propose d’explorer deux éthiques fondées sur l’impassibilité et le détachement, la première dans la tradition gréco-romaine du stoïcisme impérial (Sénèque, Épictète et Marc-Aurèle), la seconde dans la tradition indienne du bouddhisme ancien et Mahayana. Il s’agit d’étudier les convergences et les divergences dans la pratique et la réalisation de l’impassibilité et du détachement dans ces deux traditions.

Nous examinerons l'exigence d'un détachement de l'esprit à l'égard des circonstances extérieures qui causées et conditionnées ne peuvent être autres qu'elles ne sont—ce que les stoïciens nomment l’Amor Fati et le bouddhisme la loi de la conditionnalité.

Le détachement de l’esprit, qui est l’expression de la liberté humaine, est la condition de l'impassibilité, c'est-à-dire d'une paix intérieure qui une fois établie ne peut plus être ébranlée. La liberté est comprise comme une liberté intérieure grâce à laquelle l'esprit devenu « citadelle intérieure », comme le veut Marc-Aurèle, à l’abri de tout trouble, a rompu avec toute passion. La vie dépassionnée du sage est, dans les deux traditions, une vie pleinement accomplie et réalisée.

Évaluation

Exposé oral (30%) durée 30 mn environ suivi d’un travail écrit (30%) (10 à 15 pages sur le même sujet que l’exposé oral).
Examen final (40%) : travail écrit

Bibliographie

  • Sénèque, Entretiens et Lettres à Lucilius, Paris, Laffont, 1993
  • Marc-Aurèle, Pensées pour moi-même, suivi du Manuel d’Épictète, Paris, GF, 1990
  • Dhammapada, Les stances de la Loi, (trad. de Jean-Pierre Osier, Flammarion, 1997)
  • Digha Nikaya – traduction de Môhan Wijayaratna- Edition Paris, Lis – 2010
  • Majjhima Nikaya -traduction intégrale de Môhan Wijayaratna (5 volumes) – Edition Lis – 2014 (Les suttas sont pour la plupart disponibles en ligne téléchargeables gratuitement)
  • Nagarjuna, Conseils au Roi (Paris, Seuil, 2000)
  • Shantideva, Guide du mode de vie du Boddhisattva (Pris, Tharpa, 2009).
PHI 5733 A: Philosophie moderne I
Helvétius. Désir, éducation, politique.
Professeur: Mitia Rioux-Beaulne
Jours et heures: À venir

Description de cours

Claude-Adrien Helvétius est, du point de vue même de Jeremy Bentham, le penseur du 18e siècle qui a jeté les fondations de ce qu’on nomme aujourd’hui l’utilitarisme. Mais c’est là couper court à la richesse d’une pensée qui ne saurait se réduire à une morale de l’intérêt. Helvétius, en effet, es avant tout un penseur de l’esprit, c’est-à-dire de la mécanique du désir et des représentations qui président à l’organisation de la vie humaine. S’il montre le caractère central de l’intérêt comme moteur de toute action, il montre aussi comment cet intérêt est toujours empêtrée dans la machine infernale de l’amour-propre.

Pour seul remède à ce dévoiement de l’intérêt, il y a l’éducation. L’empirisme d’Helvétius pose en effet pour principe que l’être humain est le résultat de sa trajectoire, et que celle-ci, livrée au hasard, ou, pire, aux aléas de la vie mondaine, est le ferment de la désagrégation du tissu social dont la monarchie française du 18e siècle est l’exemplification même. Toute réforme passera donc nécessairement par une refonte de l’éducation : il s’agit, au sens propre, pour l’être humain, de prendre en charge sa destinée, en décidant de se donner pour guide la lumière de la raison – non une raison froide et abstraite, mais une raison ancrée dans son origine sensible, capable de se ressaisir de la sensibilité qui est son moteur et de rester à son écoute.

De là découle une pensée politique sans concession, qui met à mal les tentatives du pouvoir d’instaurer sa légitimité dans les lieux de la théologie, qui cherche à penser la souveraineté en régime d’immanence, en s’appuyant sur une dynamique des affects.

Ce séminaire sera consacré à l’étude des deux ouvrages majeurs d’Helvétius que sont De l’esprit et De l’homme, lesquels ont eu un très grand retentissement lors de leur publication, conduisant à leur interdiction et, par le fait même, leur attirant un lectorat imposant durant toute la seconde moitié du 18e siècle et ce, jusque dans la première partie du 20e siècle. Aujourd’hui moins connue, cette œuvre mérite pourtant d’être étudiée pour elle-même, en tant que pièce maîtresse de la pensée des Lumières.

Évaluation

L’évaluation portera sur trois types de travaux que les étudiants doivent produire afin de contribuer au progrès du séminaire.

1) Un exposé oral sur un ouvrage de littérature secondaire pertinent pour le cours     20%
2) Un travail de mi-session, qui prendra la forme d’une bibliographie commentée qui sera partagée avec la classe, de manière à constituer un dossier de recherches dont tous les participants au séminaire pourront tirer profit pour leurs propres travaux.        20%
3) Un travail final d’environ 20-30 pages, portant sur un aspect de la pensée d’Helvétius.     50%
4) Un très court compte rendu de lecture par semaine servant à préparer la discussion qui aura lieu dans le séminaire.        10%

Bibliographie

HELVÉTIUS, Claude-Adrien.

  • De l’esprit
  • De l’homme

DIDEROT, Denis.

  • Réfutation d’Helvétius
PHI 5765 A: Métaphysique II
Idéalisme et réalisme, histoire d'une querelle de Kant à nos jours
Professeur: Isabelle Thomas-Fogiel
Jours et heures: À venir
 
Description de cours
 
Les philosophes qui, aujourd’hui, revendiquent explicitement le terme « idéaliste » sont rares, voire inexistants. L’adjectif ne semble plus devoir désigner que des penseurs du passé : les représentants de l’idéalisme allemand, puis, au début du vingtième siècle, Bradley et Husserl. Mais si l’idéalisme n’est plus guère revendiqué aujourd’hui, cela ne signifie pas qu’il ait disparu des livres nouvellement écrits, loin s’en faut. En effet, depuis une trentaine d’années, le terme est abondamment utilisé par la pléthore de philosophes qui se réclament du « réalisme », lequel représente la « constellation conceptuelle » majeure de notre début de vingt-unième siècle, comme l’idéalisme avait incarné celle du début du dix-neuvième. Or les réalistes contemporains utilisent le terme « idéalisme » comme un antonyme du réalisme, un ennemi à abattre, voire un épouvantail. Il n’est pour s’en convaincre que de citer Bouveresse qui définit le réalisme comme « se méfier systématiquement de l’idéalisme » , Tiercelin qui parle de la « puissante menace idéaliste qui pèse aujourd’hui, y compris sur la science et en particulier la physique » , ou encore Meillassoux qui voit, dans l’idéalisme kantien et ses multiples variantes, une « catastrophe » . On peut, de même, relever, du côté de la phénoménologie la plus contemporaine, la reprise quasi obsessionnelle d’un même titre, celui de « révolution anti-copernicienne » (Richir, Romano, Pradelle) ; révolution anti-copernicienne qu’il est aisé de comparer à la révolution ptolémaïque, souhaitée par Meillassoux dans Après la Finitude. Bref, une grande partie de la philosophie de ces trente dernières années a remis sur le devant de la scène la querelle de  l’idéalisme et du réalisme, mais de manière éminemment réactive puisque l’idéalisme ne sert plus au réalisme qu’à se poser en s’opposant, à se déterminer en rejetant, à s’identifier en excluant.

Le cours s’interrogera d’abord sur ces définitions que l’on trouve de l’idéalisme dans le réalisme contemporain (I) et confrontera ensuite ces définitions à la réelle histoire du terme « idéalisme », que nous entreprendrons à travers des textes de Leibniz, Kant, Fichte, Hegel et Husserl (II). Le cours enfin cherchera à restituer la grave équivoque qui pèse aujourd’hui sur ce débat (III). Nous verrons comment le contresens contemporain sur l’idéalisme consiste d’une part à rattacher le concept d’idéalisme à la notion de subjectivité quand  il se rattache, depuis sa naissance, à la notion d’idéalité, et d’autre part à le penser à partir de la catégorie de réalité ou d’existence de la chose, là où il était d’abord question, pour l’idéalisme, de la validité du sens. La plongée dans les textes de chacun des protagonistes nous permettra de présenter sous un autre angle la querelle de l’idéalisme et du réalisme qui, paradoxalement, traverse et anime encore la philosophie de notre XXIe siècle.

Évaluation

Non spécifiée.

Bibliographie

Non spécifiée. 

PHI 6101 A: Selected Problems I
Consciousness: An Interdisciplinary Perspective from Neuroscience, Philosophy and Psychology
Professor: Vincent Bergeron
Day and Time: TBA
 
Course description
 
In this course we will address two fundamental questions in the study of the mind: 1.  what is consciousness? 2. can we explain the emergence and operation of this central feature of human life by analyzing the brain? We will pay particular attention to philosophical, neuroscientific, and psychological methods of investigation. The discussions will be organized around four themes: 1. the nature of conscious perception in both humans and animals, 2. the development of conscious thought in infants and young children, 3.  altered states of consciousness as they occur in normal and disordered sleep, and 4. the role of consciousness in decision making (volition). The course will consist of three hour sessions on a particular topic interspersed with student presentations on that topic. There will be twelve sessions in total including seven lecture and four presentation sessions, and one wrap-up session.

Course Directors:  Profs Vincent Bergeron (Vincent.Bergeron@uottawa.ca) and Leonard Maler (lmaler@uottawa.ca)

Course lecturers:  Dr. Atance (Psychology), Dr. Bergeron (Philosophy), Dr. Maler (Cellular and Molecular Medicine), Dr. Fogel (Psychology).

Course Registration and prerequisites. This course will be limited to a maximum of 12 students; Instructor permission (both Drs. Bergeron and Maler) will be required to register. Graduate students from the Neuroscience program (Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine) and the Departments of Philosophy and Psychology will be eligible to enroll.

Grading. Grading will be based on evaluations of student participation (10%), student presentations (20%), three within-course commentaries (30%) and one final research essay (40%).

Participation: 10 marks total. Student participation is defined as a student asking questions or making comments during both formal lectures and the presentations of other students. The questions or comments should be based on the assigned reading for that session and should demonstrate active thinking about the subject matter.

Professors will judge the degree of participation and assign a grade of 0 or 1 for each of the 12 sessions. The top ten grades will be used to assign a final participation grade.

Commentaries: Each commentary will consist of three pages with 1.5 line spacing on one or two related papers. It will not be merely a summary of the reading(s), but a critical evaluation of one claim, argument, or conclusion. Each commentary will be worth 10%. The commentaries will be interspersed throughout the course so as to cover the widest possible range of topics. The Professors lecturing on a particular topic will provide a list of pertinent papers and students can choose their commentary topic from amongst these papers. It may be that a student comes across a relevant paper(s) from outside the lists provided; in this case the student can, with permission of the relevant Professor(s), use this paper(s) as the basis for a commentary.

Presentations: There will be three presentations per presentation session and therefore 12 presentations in all. Each student will give one presentation. A presentation will be broader in scope than a commentary. It will extend across more papers and disciplines, e.g., neuroscience and philosophy. Each presentation plus associated discussion will be approximately 45 minutes in duration. The presentation itself should be approximately 20 minutes in duration to leave time for discussion. The presentation will be worth 20 marks. The Professors in charge of a session will, in consultation with the students, assign presentation topics.

Essay: Essays will have 1.5 line spacing and be approximately 15 pages in length not including Figures or the bibliography. They will be due within two weeks after the formal end of the course. The Professors in consultation with students will set the essay topics. Topics will be closely connected to the lecture topics and be broader than what will be covered by the commentaries or presentations. The essay must go beyond the course reading and use other literature to demonstrate the students’ ability to defend a claim / thesis— using empirical, theoretical, philosophical arguments—about consciousness or volition from the perspectives of Neuroscience, Psychology and Philosophy.

The course will focus on two key themes within the general Brain/Mind problem – can we explain the operations of the human mind by analyzing the human brain? The specific foci will be the problems of ‘consciousness’ and ‘volition’ (free will). It is, for ethical reasons, usually not possible to carry invasive experiments on the human brain. We will therefore discuss whether animals might not also be conscious and able to exercise ‘free will’ and how we would be able to determine this. In particular, we will confine our consideration of consciousness to ‘conscious perception’ because perception can, in principle, be investigated in both humans and animals and its neural correlates can be experimentally examined. We will then discuss whether or how behavioral experiments can be used to attribute conscious perception in an animal.

Conscious Perception (five sessions total: three lectures and two presentation sessions)

Drs. Bergeron and Maler will jointly present the first five sessions on Conscious Perception; they will consist of three formal lectures where the students will be expected to engage in vigorous discussion. There will also be two sessions of student presentations where the students will again participate by having read the assigned material and engaging in the ensuing class discussion.

Development of Consciousness (One lecture)

Dr. Atance will lecture on research with young infants showing that they have the capacity to think, reason, and problem-solve about the physical and psychological worlds. In fact, some argue that infants/young children are more “conscious” than adults. Yet, despite such claims, what may be fundamentally lacking in young children’s thought (and what we might consider a key attribute of consciousness) is the capacity to reflect on their knowledge. This reflective capacity develops markedly over the preschool years and its development will be the focus of the second part of this lecture.

Sleep, Dreaming and Consciousness (One lecture).

Dr. Fogel will discuss how normal and disordered sleep can serve as a window to understand how levels of both physiological/behavioural arousal and dream content can refine our understanding of consciousness.

The lectures by Drs. Atance and Fogel will be followed by one presentation session that will cover the readings for both lectures

Volition  (Two lectures and one presentation session)

Drs. Bergeron and Maler will jointly present Neuroscience, Psychology and Philosophy perspectives on ‘free will’.

The course will end with one final presentation session. The presentations in this session will emphasize the integration of research on consciousness and volition across disciplines. 

Printemps / Été 2019

PHI 5334 A: Anglo-American Philosophy I
Cavell’s The Claim of Reason
Professor: Patrice Philie
Tuesday and Thursday: 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., DMS 11143

Course description

In this seminar, we will read together and try to understand the gist of Stanley Cavell’s classic The Claim of Reason.  This is the best introduction to Cavell’s work – indeed, one could even say that all of the themes recurrent in his philosophy are found in this book.  In it, he discusses, in his own inimitable style, Wittgenstein’s masterpiece Philosophical Investigations, his very personal, ‘tragic’, approach on skepticism, the views of John Austin, the nature of philosophy, the nature of rationality and of morality.  It’s a very rich work, one that is currently going through a revival as seen by the numerous papers and books recently published that pertain to The Claim of Reason.  The goal of the seminar will be to tackle and come to a fruitful understanding of Cavell’s way of approaching philosophical problems through a careful reading of his book in the light of recent commentaries and debates.

Evaluation

Participation in class (10%)
Oral presentation (30%)
Term paper (60%). 

Details concerning this evaluation will be given in the course outline.

Bibliography

  • Cavell, S. (1999)  The Claim of Reason, Harvard.
  • __________. (2002) Must We Mean What We Say?, Cambridge.
  • __________. (2010) Little did I Know – Excerpts from Memory, Stanford.
  • Crary, A., & Shieh, S. (2006) Reading Cavell, Routledge.
  • Goodman, R. (2005) Contending with Stanley Cavell, Oxford.
  • ​​​​​​Mulhall, S. (1994) Stanley Cavell : Philosophy’s R

Hiver 2019

PHI 5343 A: Metaphysics

Episodes from the History of Analytic Philosophy: Russell and Carnap on the Logical Structure of the World
Professor: Paul Rusnock
Day and Time: TBA

Course description

In this course, we will study some classics of early twentieth-century analytical philosophy, notably Russell’s Philosophy of Logical Atomism, and Our Knowledge of the External World and Carnap’s Aufbau. Brilliant examples of the application of the then brand-new “new logic” to traditional philosophical problems, these works still have, for all their shortcomings, much to teach us today.

Evaluation

Presentation(s), Paper(s)

Bibliography

  • B. Russell, The Philosophy of Logical Atomism (Reprint Chicago: Open Court, 1998)
  • B. Russell, Our Knowledge of the External World (Reprint London: Routledge, 2009)
  • R. Carnap, The Logical Structure of the World, ed. and tr. R. A. George (Chicago: Open Court, 2003)
  • We may also use: B. Russell, The Analysis of Matter (Reprint London: Routledge, 2001)
  • And will certainly consult the voluminous secondary literature.
PHI 5344 A: Philosophical Anthropology

The Humanism of Bernard Williams
Professor: Hilliard Aronovitch
Day and Time: TBA

Course description

The writings of Bernard Williams (1929-2003) on ethics, politics, and personal identity have been heralded as highly original and influential, and remarkable for combining analytical precision with human insights and a sense for large issues. Prominent philosophers who have been his significant interlocutors include: Alasdair MacIntyre, John McDowell, Thomas Nagel, Martha Nussbaum, Derek Parfit, Amartya Sen, and Charles Taylor. This seminar will critically address Williams on ethical character, the rationality of emotions, utilitarianism, naturalism, liberalism, modern vs. ancient morality, and on special issues including "moral luck", the (un)desirability of immortality, and the problem of "dirty hands" in politics. As well as investigating important topics and the work of a particularly fertile thinker, the seminar will be a study in a mode of doing philosophy.

Évaluation

Commentary 1 on designated reading, 1000 words 20%
Commentary 2 on designated reading, 1000 words 20%
Project for paper, 10 min. presentation or 500 word submission 10%
Paper, 4000-5000 words 50%


Bibliographie

To be drawn from these books and other sources:

  • Bernard Williams, Problems of the Self: Philosophical Papers 1956-1972 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973).
  • ------------------------, Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973-1980 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981).
  • ------------------------, Making Sense of Humanity and Other Philosophical Papers 1982-1993 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).
  • ------------------------, Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline, edited by A. W. Moore (Princeton University Press, 2006).
  •  Also: articles by Derek Parfit, Charles Taylor, Thomas Nagel, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Stocker, among others.
PHI 5345 A: Ethics I

Contemporary Approaches to Moral Psychology
Professor: Andrew Sneddon
Day and Time: TBA

Course description

Philosophical moral psychology focuses on the psychological capacities that realize moral agency and the philosophical issues that they raise. Specific questions include: What are the psychological foundations of morality? What psychological capacities enable us to evaluate actions? To act in accordance with moral norms? To attribute moral responsibility to ourselves and others? These are some of the topics of this course.

Philosophers have long used the traditional a priori methods of their discipline to address these issues. Accordingly, there is some classic work in the contemporary anglo-american tradition that is illuminating, or at least interestingly suggestive, about moral psychology. However, the early 21st century finds us in the midst of a burgeoning Golden Era in philosophical moral psychology. The central reason for this is an influx of empirical information into philosophical thought about moral psychology. This course will look at some contemporary classics in moral psychology, but the bulk of the course is about the a posteriori trends that are emerging.

Évaluation

Non spécifiée.

Bibliographie

Likely authors include :

  • Valerie Tiberius
  • Daniel Wegner
  • Alfred Mele
  • Sharon Street
  • Michael Smith
  • Shaun Nichols
  • Jonathan Haidt
  • John Doris
  • P.F. Strawson
  • Harry Frankfurt
  • Joshua Greene
PHI 5731 A: Philosophie ancienne

L’ontologie impossible: Pourquoi Héraclite a raison contre Parménide selon Nagarjuna
Professeur: Catherine Collobert
Jour et heure:  Jeudi 14h30-17h20, TBT325

Course description

Platon, on le sait, a présenté dans le Théétète la philosophie comme un champ de bataille (avant Kant) où s’affrontent deux protagonistes Parménide et Héraclite. Ces derniers incarnent, selon Platon, deux positions philosophiques antagonistes, respectivement celle de l’être et celle du devenir, qu’il va s’efforcer de concilier.

Cette conciliation est pour Nagarjuna (philosophe indien du IIe s. de notre ère) impossible parce qu’elle résulte d’une méprise fondamentale sur la nature de la réalité qui est essentiellement comme Héraclite l’affirme flux. Nagarjuna, philosophe de la déconstruction (avant l’heure), met à bas toutes nos catégories de pensée, qui reposent sur une opposition dualiste intenable selon lui. Il propose une voie inédite que la philosophie occidentale n’a pas thématisée, voie qui permet, en retour, d’interroger les grandes catégories sur lesquelles la philosophie occidentale repose.

Ce séminaire de philosophie comparée se propose d’examiner le Poème de Parménide, qui a posé les fondations de l’ontologie occidentale, les Fragments d’Héraclite, qui rendent cette ontologie caduque — comme l’ont bien compris Platon et Aristote. Nous verrons à partir de cet examen comment Nagarjuna résout le conflit, non à la manière de Platon ou de Kant, mais en dissolvant les catégories en jeu dans ce conflit pour proposer une doctrine de la vacuité, doctrine de la voie médiane (madhyamika) aux effets roboratifs et libérateurs.

Parménide, Le Poème ; Héraclite, Fragments ; Nagarjuna, Traité du milieu, Stances du milieu par excellence, le livre de la chance

PHI 5771 A: Philosophie sociale et politique II

La critique de la religion chez Hobbes et Spinoza : L’interprétation de Leo Strauss
Professeur: Daniel Tanguay
Jour et heure: À venir

Course description

Selon Leo Strauss, l’un des moments fondateurs de la modernité politique fut la critique de la religion de la révélation que l’on trouve dans deux des grands traités « théologico-politiques » modernes : le Léviathan (1651) de Hobbes et le Traité théologico-politique (1670) de Spinoza. Ces traités cherchent à redéfinir la place de la religion dans la cité ou, plus précisément, à émanciper la sphère politique et civile de la tutelle religieuse. Or, une telle redéfinition du rapport de la religion au politique passait nécessairement dans l’esprit de ces philosophes par une critique des prétentions de toute religion révélée à dire la vérité finale sur la condition humaine. C’est pourquoi, comme le montre l’interprétation de Strauss, cette critique de la religion constitue une étape essentielle dans le projet politique plus global d’un Hobbes ou Spinoza de fonder un État dont le pouvoir ne dépendrait plus d’une quelconque Église ou religion constituée. Le but de ce séminaire est d’explorer la reconstruction complexe que Strauss présente de cette critique hobbésienne et spinoziste de la religion. On savait que Strauss avait exploré le dédale de cette critique dans son premier ouvrage — La critique de la religion chez Spinoza (1930), mais on ignorait jusqu’à tout récemment qu’il avait aussi en quelque sorte préparé un complément à son premier ouvrage qui aurait porté le titre de La critique de la religion chez Hobbes. Cet ouvrage inachevé a fait l’objet d’une publication en allemand en 2001,  puis d’une traduction française (2005) et d’une traduction américaine (2011). Ces deux ouvrages nous serviront de guides dans cet examen qui exigera bien sûr de constants allers et retours entre les traités classiques de Hobbes et de Spinoza et le commentaire subtil et nuancé qu’en propose Strauss. Nous espérons pouvoir ainsi explorer un pan essentiel de notre modernité politique en réexaminant les arguments essentiels qui l’ont tout d’abord justifiée.

Évaluation

1) Participation.............................................................................…………………....10%

2) Travail principal (en deux étapes).................................................................90%

a) Problématique, hypothèses, bibliographie.......................................................15%

i) présentation orale du travail (10 minutes) lors d’une rencontre
individuelle……………………………........................................................................... 5%

ii) présentation écrite de 4 pages …………........................................................10%

b) Travail final.........................................................................................................75%

i) présentation orale de 20 minutes………........................................................25%

ii) présentation écrite de 15-30 pages……………...............................................50%

Bibliographie

  • Ouvrages classiques
  • HOBBES, Thomas, Léviathan, trad. par G. Mairet, Paris, Gallimard, 2000.
  •  SPINOZA, Baruch, Traité théologico-politique, trad. par J. Lagrée et P.-F. Moreau, Paris, PUF, 1999
  • Ouvrages de Leo Straus
  •  STRAUSS, Leo, La critique de la religion chez Hobbes. Une contribution à la compréhension des Lumières (1933-1934), trad. par C. Pelluchon, Paris, PUF, 2005.
  •  STRAUSS, Leo, Hobbes’s Critique of Religion and Related Writings, trad. par G. Bartlett and S. Minkov, Chicago The University of Chicago Press, 2011.
  •  STRAUSS, Leo, La critique de la religion chez Spinoza ou les fondements de la science spinoziste de la Bible. Recherches pour une étude du Traité théologico-politique, trad. par G. Almaleh, A. Baraquin et M. Depadt-Ejchenbaum, Paris, Cerf, 1996.
PHI 5777 A: Philosophie de l’art

Naissance de l’esthétique philosophique
Professeur: Mitia Rioux-Beaulne
Jour et heure: À venir

Course description

On peut, dans une certaine mesure, considérer que l’esthétique philosophique naît au tournant du 18e siècle, au moment où de nombreux philosophes, notamment empiristes, mettent de l’avant l’idée qu’une théorie du goût doit d’abord être une théorie du plaisir, faisant ainsi de l’expérience esthétique du sujet le critère de l’évaluation de la beauté. Addison, Hutcheson, Shaftesbury et Hume dans l’espace anglo-saxon seront les plus influents et auront des échos jusqu’en France et en Allemagne. Dans l’espace francophone, une fusion de l’empirisme et de ce que Jacques Chouillet a appelé les « métaphysiques du beau » qui ont eu cours dans la première moitié du 18e siècle donnera lieu à des développements audacieux chez les Du Bos, Batteux et Diderot. Dans l’espace germanique, c’est l’influence persistante de la pensée de Leibniz et les efforts faits pour la rendre compatible avec celle de Locke qui donnera lieu à certains développements spécifiques chez les Baumgarten, Lessing ou Sulzer.

Ce séminaire sera dédié à l’étude de textes fondateurs de tous ces auteurs qui ont pavé la voie à l’émergence d’une esthétique philosophique conçue comme une discipline autonome, et, de manière plus particulière, à la définition kantienne de cette autonomie dans la troisième critique. C’est donc cette troisième critique que nous prendrons comme terminus ad quem, nous efforçant de comprendre en quel sens s’y cristallise d’une manière très spécifique quelque chose qui était en marche depuis près d’un siècle.
 

Évaluation

Exposé oral 20%
Bibliographie commentée 20%
Travail final 50%
Comptes rendus de lecture hebdomadaires 10%


Bibliographie

  • ADDISON, Joseph. The Spectator.
  • BATTEUX, Charles. Les Beaux-Arts réduits à un même principe.
  • BAUMGARTEN, Alexander Gottlieb. Aesthetica.
  • CROUSAZ, Jean-Pierre de. Traité du Beau.
  • DIDEROT, Denis. Traité du Beau.
  • DU BOS, Jean-Baptiste. Réflexions critiques sur la poésie et la peinture.
  • HUME, David. De la norme du goût.
  • HUTCHESON, Francis. Recherches sur l’origine de nos idées de beauté et de vertu.
  • KANT, Emmanuel. Critique de la Faculté de juger.
  • LESSING, Gotthold Ephraim. Laocoon.
  • SHAFTESBURY, Anhony Ashley-Cooper, Third Earl of. Characteristics of men, manners, opinions, times.
  • SULZER, Johann Georg. Théorie générale des beaux-arts.

Automne 2018

PHI 5336 A: German Philosophy I

Hegel’s Philosophy of Absolute Spirit (Art, Religion and Philosophy)
Professor: Jeffrey Reid
Day and Time: Tuesday 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., room DMS 8143

Course description

The course proposes a reading of selections from Hegel’s introductory lectures on art, religion and philosophy, the three areas of his “Science” that constitute, in his teaching manual known as the  Encyclopedia of Philosophical Sciences (1817-31), what he refers to as Absolute Spirit.  In order to understand the place occupied by art, religion and philosophy within Hegel’s system, we must acknowledge Absolute Spirit’s place as the last chapter in Hegel’s Philosophy of Spirit and therefore as the last word of his system.  The Encyclopedia chapter on Absolute Spirit is comprised of dense, highly conceptual, abbreviated pronunciations on art, religion and philosophy.  Hegel’s lectures, as he presented them briefly at Heidelberg and then extensively at Berlin, were oral commentaries on these difficult, short sections. Fortunately for us, the substance of his actual lectures has been preserved (through his own notes and those of several students) and published as his well-known lectures on the subjects, which form the content of Absolute Spirit.  The texts we will read are introductions drawn from these lectures. At their best, in spite of on-going philological debates on provenance etc., the lectures provide a lively, pedagogical and relatively clear account of Hegelian thought, showing his awareness of its difficulties and providing some insight into the man himself. The lectures also afford an excellent introduction to his philosophy, one that even the most experienced Hegel scholars do well to revisit.  Although each of the topics could, in themselves, offer enough material for a full seminar course, presenting them in reference to the Encyclopedia chapter on Absolute Spirit will ensure that we do not lose sight of the overall, systematic context in which the three specific objects/contents of Hegel’s philosophy take place.  In this light, art, religion and philosophy appear as the absolute expressions of human spirit and, reciprocally, as the human revelations of the Absolute.

Hegel’s Absolute Spirit raises questions about the systematic nature of his philosophy, its scientific pretensions and the meanings he attaches to that famous or infamous substantive: das Absolute.  Just how totalizing is it?  Is the Absolute human or divine, or, to the extent that these two terms are mediated by the essential third term of freedom, both?  Indeed, if we grasp the Philosophy of Spirit (following the Logic and the Philosophy of Nature) as the developing narrative of freedom, from its abstract beginnings in individual subjective mind (Subjective Spirit), through its concrete instantiations in the State and its history (Objective Spirit), then we are tempted see art, religion and philosophy as essentially human expressions of the Idea’s free self-enjoyment, which Hegel portrays, in the final words of the Encyclopedia, as the perfect activity of Aristotle’s God.

Évaluation

Oral presentation of one text under discussion 30%
5-7 page personal reflection on an issue/question pertaining to the material 50%
Attendance/participation 20%


Bibliographie

  •  G. W. F. Hegel, On Art, Religion and the History of Philosophy, Introductory Lectures, edited by J. Glenn Gray, Introduction by Tom Rockmore, (Indiannapolis: Hacket, 1997 [1970, Harper and Row].
  •  For the Encyclopedia sections on Absolute Spirit, see below: N.B. This is not necessary to buy!  If I refer to the sections, I will either dictate short passages or photocopy them. As well, I will put the book below on Reserve at the Morisset Library.
  • Hegel’s Philosophy of Mind, translated by W. Wallace and A.V. Miller (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1971).  This is a reissue of the Wallace translation, with the Boumann additions (Zusätze) to the Subjective Spirit section added, translated by Miller, with a new introduction by J.N. Findlay. ISBN 0198750145 (paperback)
PHI 5365 A: Metaphysics II

Wittgenstein
Professor: David Hyder
Day and Time: Tuesday 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m., room 10143

Course description

1. Introduction

2. Frege and Russell

Frege: “Sense and Reference”

Russell: “The Theory of Logical Types”, 2.i-iii (LOM)

T: 5.47-5.4733

3. Propositions and Logical Space T: 1-3.5; 5.535-5.5422

4. Rules and Internal Relations “Notes Dictated to Moore” (LOM) pp. 211-216 T: 4-4.53; 6.1-6.13

5. Logic and Science T: 5-5.641, 6.2-7

6. Mysticism and Values T: 7

7. Names and Language Games PI: §§ 1-65

8. Determinate Sense and Philosophical Analysis  PI: §§ 65-133

9. Meaning and Understanding PI: §§ 134-184

10. Following a Rule PI: §§ 185-245

11. Kripke 1 Kripke, ch. 1, 2

12. Private Language PI: §§ 246-315

13. Kripke 2 Kripke, ch. 3
 

Évaluation

Presentation 20%
Participation 10%
Final paper of 20 pages which can be based on the presentation 70%


Bibliographie

  •  Wittgenstein, Ludwig. Tractatus logico-philosophicus. London: Routledge. 2001. (TLP)
  •  Wittgenstein, Ludwig. Philosophical Investigations. London: Routledge. 2005. (RP)
  •  Kripke, Saul A. Wittgenstein On Rules and Private Language. Paris: Seuil. 1996. (à commander au début du cours)

PHI 5732 A: Philosophie médiévale

Le «Monisme Panthéiste» en histoire de la philosophie: Jean Scot Érigène, Giordano Bruno et Spinoza
Professeurr: Antoine Côté
Jour et heure: Mercredi 8 h 30 à 11 h 30 pièce MRT 015

Course description

Il n’est pire erreur selon un certain consensus en métaphysique que celle qui consiste à confondre Dieu et la nature, car cela revient à attribuer à une même réalité des propriétés mutuellement incompatibles. C’est la confusion qu’on a reprochée, à tort ou à raison, à Jean Scot Érigène (IXe siècle), Giordano Bruno (XVIe siècle) et Spinoza (XVIIe siècle). L’objectif de ce cours est d’examiner les pièces essentielles du dossier chez ces trois auteurs – des extraits précis du Periphyseon de Jean Scot Érigène, du De la cause, du principe et de l’unité de Giordano Bruno, et de L’Éthique de Spinoza (livre I surtout) – en vue de déterminer, autant que faire se peut, si le reproche est fondé, et dans la mesure où il le serait, quelles réponses nos auteurs peuvent apporter à leurs critiques.

Évaluation

1) Présentation orale

2) Questions/commentaires hebdomadaires portant sur les lectures de la semaine en cours à afficher sur le forum de discussion du cours

3) Un descriptif de recherche d’une page accompagnée d’une bibliographie

4) Un travail écrit de vingt pages.

Bibliographie

Voir description

PHI 5743 A: Métaphysique I

Idéalisme et réalisme, histoire d’une querelle de Kant à nos jours
Professeur: Isabelle Thomas-Fogiel
Jour et heure: Lundi 14 h 30 – 17 h 30 pièce DMS 10143

Course description

Les philosophes qui, aujourd’hui, revendiquent explicitement le terme « idéaliste » sont rares, voire inexistants. L’adjectif ne semble plus devoir désigner que des penseurs du passé : les représentants de l’idéalisme allemand, puis, au début du vingtième siècle, Bradley, Royce ou Husserl. Mais si l’idéalisme n’est plus guère revendiqué aujourd’hui, cela ne signifie pas qu’il ait disparu des livres nouvellement écrits, loin s’en faut. En effet, depuis une trentaine d’années, le terme est abondamment utilisé par la pléthore de philosophes qui se réclament du « réalisme », lequel représente la « constellation conceptuelle » majeure de notre début de vingt-unième siècle, comme l’idéalisme avait incarné celle du début du dix-neuvième. Or les réalistes contemporains utilisent le terme « idéalisme » comme un antonyme du réalisme, un ennemi à abattre, voire un épouvantail. Il n’est pour s’en convaincre que de citer Bouveresse qui définit le réalisme comme « se méfier systématiquement de l’idéalisme »[1], Tiercelin qui parle de la « puissante menace idéaliste qui pèse aujourd’hui, y compris sur la science et en particulier la physique »[2], ou encore Meillassoux qui voit, dans l’idéalisme kantien et ses multiples variantes, une « catastrophe »[3]. On peut, de même, relever, du côté de la phénoménologie la plus contemporaine, la reprise quasi obsessionnelle d’un même titre, celui de « révolution anti-copernicienne » (Richir, Romano, Pradelle). Bref, une grande partie de la philosophie de ces trente dernières années a remis sur le devant de la scène la querelle de l’idéalisme et du réalisme, mais de manière éminemment réactive puisque l’idéalisme ne sert plus au réalisme qu’à se poser en s’opposant, à se déterminer en rejetant, à s’identifier en excluant.

Le cours s’interrogera d’abord sur ces définitions que l’on trouve de l’idéalisme dans le réalisme contemporain (I) et confrontera ensuite ces définitions à la réelle histoire du terme « idéalisme », que nous entreprendrons à travers des textes de Leibniz, Kant, Fichte, Hegel Husserl, Bradley et Royce (II). Le cours enfin cherchera à restituer la grave équivoque qui pèse aujourd’hui sur ce débat (III). Nous verrons comment le contresens contemporain sur l’idéalisme (contresens qui, historiquement, prend sa source dans la lecture de Berkeley par Diderot) consiste d’une part à rattacher le concept d’idéalisme à la notion de subjectivité quand il se rattache, depuis sa naissance, à la notion d’idéalité, et d’autre part à penser la notion de vérité à partir de la seule catégorie de réalité ou d’existence de la chose (ce qui est là), quand il était d’abord question, pour l’idéalisme, de penser la notion de vérité à partir de celle d’universalité (ce qui, en droit, est valide en tout lieu et en tout temps et qui de ce fait, n’est pas ce qui est là, premier, originaire et en soi mais devient une norme visée ou une idéalité à réaliser). La plongée dans les textes de chacun des protagonistes nous permettra de présenter sous un autre angle la querelle de l’idéalisme et du réalisme.

Évaluation

1) Examen mi-session (30 pour cent de la note globale)

2) Devoir de synthèse (40 pour cent)

3) Exposé oral (25 pour cent)

4) 5 pour cent pour la participation.

La présence au cours est obligatoire. Toute absence aux examens doit être justifiée.

Bibliographie

Sera distribuée aux étudiants. 

PHI 5746 A: Philosophie sociale et politique

Justice, multiculturalisme et peuples autochtones
Professeur: David Robichaud
Jour et heure: Mercredi 14 h 30 – 17 h 30 pièce THN 054

Course description

Plusieurs auteurs ont défendu le multiculturalisme afin de produire une situation juste entre les membres de divers groupes culturels, nationaux, linguistiques et religieux. Cependant, on a souvent laissé les peuples autochtones à l’écart de ces réflexions, arguant que la situation autochtone au Canada méritait un traitement particulier. Le multiculturalisme peut-il penser les nations autochtones ? Entre justice distributive, justice réparatrice et reconnaissance, entre les positions anticolonialistes et post-colonialistes, nous aborderons les diverses positions normatives offrant des ressources permettant de penser la situation autochtone aujourd’hui. Que peuvent espérer les jeunes autochtones du Canada selon les diverses théories de la justice ? C’est la question qui traversera ce séminaire.

Évaluation

Non spécifiée.

Bibliographie

  • Delâge et Warren. Le piège de la liberté.
  • Coulthard. Red Skin, White Masks.
  • Kymlicka. Multicultural Odysseys.
PHI 6101 A: Selected problems I

Consciousness and Volition: From Neuroscience to Philosophy
Professor: Vincent Bergeron
Day and Time: Tuesday 2:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., room FSS 5023

Course description

In this course we will address two fundamental questions in the study of the mind:

1. What is consciousness?

2. Can we explain the emergence and operation of this central feature of human life by analyzing the brain?

We will pay particular attention to philosophical, neuroscientific, and psychological methods of investigation. The discussions will be organized around four themes:

1. The nature of conscious perception in both humans and animals.

2. The development of conscious thought in infants and young children.

3. Altered states of consciousness as they occur in normal and disordered sleep.

4. The role of consciousness in decision making (volition).

The course will consist of three hour sessions on a particular topic interspersed with student presentations on that topic. There will be twelve sessions in total including six lecture and six presentation sessions.

The course will focus on two key themes within the general Brain/Mind problem – can we explain the operations of the human mind by analyzing the human brain? The specific foci will be the problems of ‘consciousness’ and ‘volition’ (free will). It is, for ethical reasons, usually not possible to carry invasive experiments on the human brain. We will therefore discuss whether animals might not also be conscious and able to exercise ‘free will’ and how we would be able to determine this. In particular, we will confine our consideration of consciousness to ‘conscious perception’ because perception can, in principle, be investigated in both humans and animals and its neural correlates can be experimentally examined. We will then discuss whether or how behavioral experiments can be used to attribute conscious perception in an animal.

Conscious Perception (five sessions total: three lectures and two presentation sessions)
Drs. Bergeron and Maler will jointly present the first five sessions on Conscious Perception; they will consist of three formal lectures where the students will be expected to engage in vigorous discussion. There will also be two sessions of student presentations where the students will again participate by having read the assigned material and engaging in the ensuing class discussion.

Development of Consciousness (One lecture)
Dr. Atance will lecture on research with young infants showing that they have the capacity to think, reason, and problem-solve about the physical and psychological worlds. In fact, some argue that infants/young children are more “conscious” than adults. Yet, despite such claims, what may be fundamentally lacking in young children’s thought (and what we might consider a key attribute of consciousness) is the capacity to reflect on their knowledge. This reflective capacity develops markedly over the preschool years and its development will be the focus of the second part of this lecture.

Sleep, Dreaming and Consciousness (One lecture).
Dr. Fogel will discuss how normal and disordered sleep can serve as a window to understand how levels of both physiological/behavioural arousal and dream content can refine our understanding of consciousness.
The lectures by Drs. Atance and Fogel will be followed by one Presentation session that will cover the readings for both lectures

Volition (One lecture)
Drs. Bergeron and Maler will jointly present Neuroscience, Psychology and Philosophy perspectives on ‘free will’.
There will also be one presentation session on volition.

The course will end with one final presentation session. The presentations in this session will emphasize the integration of research on consciousness and volition across disciplines.

Course Directors
Profs Vincent Bergeron , Leonard Maler

Course lecturers
Dr. Atance (Psychology), Dr. Bergeron (Philosophy), Dr. Maler (Cellular and Molecular Medicine), Dr. Fogel (Psychology).

Course Registration and prerequisites
This course will be limited to a maximum of 12 students; Instructor permission (both Drs. Bergeron and Maler) will be required to register. Graduate students from the Neuroscience program (Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine) and the Departments of Philosophy and Psychology will be eligible to enroll.

Evaluation

Grading will be based on evaluations of student participation (10%), student presentations (30%), three within-course commentaries (30%) and one final research essay (30%).
Participation: 10 marks total. Student participation is defined as a student asking questions or making comments during both formal lectures and the presentations of other students. The questions or comments should be based on the assigned reading for that session and should demonstrate active thinking about the subject matter.
Professors will judge the degree of participation and assign a grade of 0 or 1 for each of the 12 sessions. The top ten grades will be used to assign a final participation grade.

Commentaries

Each commentary will consist of three pages with 1.5 line spacing on one or two related papers. It will not be merely a summary of the reading(s), but a critical evaluation of one claim, argument, or conclusion. Each commentary will be worth 10%. The commentaries will be interspersed throughout the course so as to cover the widest possible range of topics. The Professors lecturing on a particular topic will provide a list of pertinent papers and students can choose their commentary topic from amongst these papers. It may be that a student comes across a relevant paper(s) from outside the lists provided; in this case the student can, with permission of the relevant Professor(s), use this paper(s) as the basis for a commentary.

Presentations

There will be four presentations per presentation session and therefore 24 presentations in all. Each student will give two presentations. A presentation will be broader in scope than a commentary. It will extend across more papers and disciplines, e.g., neuroscience and philosophy. Each presentation plus associated discussion will be approximately 40 minutes in duration. The presentation itself should be approximately 20 minutes in duration to leave time for discussion. Each presentation will be worth 15 marks and so, in total, will count for 30% of the final grade. The Professors in charge of a session will, in consultation with the students, assign presentation topics.

Essay

Essays will have 1.5 line spacing and be approximately 15 pages in length not including Figures or the bibliography. They will be due within two weeks after the formal end of the course. The Professors in consultation with students will set the essay topics. Topics will be closely connected to the lecture topics and be broader than what will be covered by the commentaries or presentations. The essay must go beyond the course reading and use other literature to demonstrate the students’ ability to defend a claim / thesis— using empirical, theoretical, philosophical arguments—about consciousness or volition from the perspectives of Neuroscience, Psychology and Philosophy.

Bibliography
Unspecified

Printemps / été 2018

PHI 5359 A: German Philosophy

Heidegger: Metaphysics, Ethics, Politics
Professor: Sonia Sikka
Mondays 2:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. DMS 10143

Course description

To many, Heidegger was a profound thinker who offered an acute diagnosis of the malaise of modernity while breaking innovative new paths for overcoming its ailments: alienation from nature, over-reliance on science and technology, reduction of human beings to clever calculators, and loss of local community as well as any sense of the sacred.  To others, he was a dangerous reactionary, irrationalist in his mode of thinking and drawn towards fascistic notions of the nation as an imagined cultural whole, while opposing social and scientific progress out of nostalgia for a mythic past.  Whatever one’s assessment, Heidegger’s critical analyses of the views and institutions peculiar to the world produced by the modern West have clearly resonated with a wide audience.  In this seminar, we examine a number of these analyses, tracing the interrelation between Heidegger’s position on metaphysics, ethics and politics over the course of his philosophical career.  Topics include:  location, place and history; individual and society; the relation between human beings and “nature”; technology, art and poetry; and the question of God. Heidegger’s understanding of the history of Western metaphysics, in its attempts to delimit the really real, is pertinent to his reflections on all of these topics and will form a guiding theme throughout the seminar.

Evaluation

In-class presentation & short essay (approx 1500 words) 40%
Final essay (approx 5000 words) 60%


Bibliography

  • Extracts from Being and Time (trans. John Macquarrie and Edward Robinson).
  • Nature, History, State, 1933-34 (trans. Gregory Fried and Richard Polt).
  • “The Question Concerning Technology” (trans. William Lovitt).
  •  Poetry, Language, Thought, trans. Albert Hofstadter (1971).
Haut de page